Femineering fosters female interest

On Wednesday Oct. 12, junior high and high school girls ate a provided breakfast at a Femineering meeting. The girls meet every other Wednesday at 7:30 a.m. in the engineering room. Led by Tony Rainsberger the club boasts about 25 to 30 girls. “Femineering is a bunch of girls who like science and get together to do science related activities,” Amelia Kvalheim (12), a member of Femineering explained. ”The majority of the STEM fields right now are really aimed towards guys, I think it’s important to give girls the opportunity to explore the science world to see if they like it and want to make a career out of it.” Photo By: Lauren O'Connell

On Wednesday Oct. 12, junior high and high school girls ate a provided breakfast at a Femineering meeting. The girls meet every other Wednesday at 7:30 a.m. in the engineering room. Led by Tony Rainsberger the club boasts about 25 to 30 girls. “Femineering is a bunch of girls who like science and get together to do science related activities,” Amelia Kvalheim (12), a member of Femineering explained. ”The majority of the STEM fields right now are really aimed towards guys, I think it’s important to give girls the opportunity to explore the science world to see if they like it and want to make a career out of it.”
Photo By: Lauren O’Connell

On Wednesday Oct. 12,  junior high and high school girls ate a provided breakfast at a Femineering meeting. The girls meet every other Wednesday at 7:30 a.m. in the engineering room. Led by Tony Rainsberger the club boasts about 25 to 30 girls.

“Femineering is a bunch of girls who like science and get together to do science related activities,” Amelia Kvalheim (12), a member of Femineering explained. ”The majority of the STEM fields right now are really aimed towards guys, I think it’s important to give girls the opportunity to explore the science world to see if they like it and want to make a career out of it.”

Many studies show a significant lack of female engineers in American society. According to a 2016 report by the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, in the United States, only about 14 percent of engineers in the workforce are women.

“It’s a national problem,” Rainsberger said. “Many high school students don’t sign up for engineer classes in college.”

Just one percent of female high school students will sign up for a high school engineering class compared to a three percent male rate. Additionally, only four percent of females sign up for computer sciences versus seven of boys, as stated by the National Girls Collaborative Project. This is why femineering offers the club to junior high students as well as high schoolers, to encourage girls to start looking at engineering as a career option at a young age.

“I joined because my sister Delaney used to do it and said it was fun,”  Lily Malloy (7) said. “It’s important to tell girls that engineering isn’t just for guys.”  

By: Lauren O’Connell

oconnell.lauren@oakwoodschools.org

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