Power of Pride

On September 9th the movie Pride, directed by Matthew Warchus, premiered in the USA. The film is based on how London’s 1984 LGBT community aided miners in South Wales by raising money for them to support the strike. Because the LGBT and mining communities experienced persecution from police unlawfully, both communities needed support from the other to create a stronger agenda.

In addition to the story having a strong message of acceptance and camaraderie, it was also powerful because of the historical accuracy and stunning cinematography. With starch contrasts between the miners’ and LGBT communities in the filming, as one watched the film one quickly became empathetic to the struggle both populations faced against the law which instead of protecting them, served as their biggest enemy.

Alternately, the historical aspects of the film created such authenticity that as one left the theatre after viewing the film, one would most likely feel like they had truly learned about something they had not before known about in a pure and genuine way. Because of the various characters’ dynamics and traits, one could easily feel as if they had a deeper understanding of the year-long event’s motives and explanations which the film’s plot centers around.

One of the characters was especially moving to me. Joe had joined the group Gays and Lesbians Support the Miners (GLSM) by chance, and through that and throughout the film, Joe was able to accept himself and honor his own sexuality because of the support shown. Such support manifested not only within the group but also through his work with the miners who proved to be in desperate need due to their year-long strike.

One of the scenes in the film portrayed Joe coming home to his family and they have all of his photographs from GLSM out which is horrific to him because until then, his involvement with the LGBT community is unknown to his entire family. Shortly after this scene, Joe is able to accept who he is and excludes his family because they cannot accept him. Although this is not something that has happened to me, I found it extremely touching because of the courage the character depicted and the message it sent. To me, this message was to honor who you are and never hide it, no matter how people close to you react.

Lastly, the film was not only influential but also extremely well done,showcasing multiple talented actors which really brought the picture to mastery. Pride has done exceptionally well in the United Kingdom and in the United States and I am sure I am not the first to say that this is for well-justified reasons.

Photo contributed by BBC Films. The various marches were filmed in moving ways that gave the viewer a sense that they were in the moment with the actors. By the conclusion of the film, I felt as if I knew the characters and was somehow apart of the movement featured in the plot.

Photo contributed by BBC Films. The various marches were filmed in moving ways that gave the viewer a sense that they were in the moment with the actors. By the conclusion of the film, I felt as if I knew the characters and was somehow apart of the movement featured in the plot.

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