Frozen: Disney’s contemporary tradition

Frozen features royal sisters, a newly coronated queen, Elsa, and princess, Anna. With her sister gone MIA due to a “curse” of wielding ice, Anna sets off to retrieve the kingdom of Arendelle’s queen.

Frozen features royal sisters, a newly coronated queen, Elsa, and princess, Anna. With her sister MIA due to a “curse” of wielding ice, Anna sets off to retrieve the kingdom of Arendelle’s queen.

Disney’s third installment of their Second CGI era, Frozen, proved to attract a new generation of kids when it hit theatres the day before Thanksgiving. Looked at in succession of its predecessors, it’s easy to say that audiences will either love or hate this film for establishing a new definition of Disney. Independently, acknowledging that Frozen is a work of art is a no-brainer.

Breaking the typical Disney mold in more ways than one, the most prominent tradition-defying aspect of Frozen is the presence of two princesses, Elsa and Anna (twice the profit potential!). The younger of the two, Anna, continues the new tradition of a contemporary personality. Like Rapunzel, she has both spunk and independence. Elsa also proves to be a relatable princess, though more in a sympathizing way than in her personality quirks.

There are two distinct differences setting Frozen apart from its Disney princess predecessors, the first being the utilization of songs to move the plot forward. Unlike Brave, in which songs were not sung by characters and rather used to set mood, and unlike the much earlier films, major plot points actually occur during a musical number voiced by characters. That being said, having the songs be so vital to the progression of the story required that there be many of them. At points during the movie I found myself questioning if a third consecutive song was really necessary.

The second major difference is the purpose of the antagonist. Straying from the concrete path of a villain posing a conflict or tampering with the goal of the protagonist, the main antagonist of Frozen seemed short lived, only serving to heighten an already established conflict. In the end, the major punishment was carried out on a character who hadn’t technically done anything wrong (taking into account dramatic irony).

Independently, Frozen is a great children’s movie. Not only is it beautiful to just watch, each strand of hair being well defined in CGI graphics, but the contemporary humor is sulphurous and appealing to all ages. That being said, it is setting a precedent for a new Disney feel.

Overall, Frozen is a Disney film worth seeing, though not with the intentions of experiencing the original classics or neoclassical era that defined early princesses.

(Also, the trolls are trying too hard to be cutesy like Quazy’s gargoyles, and they’re annoying)

By Megan Reynolds

reynolds.megan@oakwoodschools.org

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